Feeders

Bird feeders being blamed for salmonella spread

A house finch eats a seed from a table in Genoa last summer.

Photo by Kurt Hildebrand.

 

Bird feeders have offered residents stuck at home due to the coronavirus an opportunity to commune with nature.

However, those feeders have also prompted warning from health and wildlife officials after finches have been found sick or dead from salmonellosis.

“Since December, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and wildlife rehabilitation centers have been inundated with calls from residents who are finding sick or dead finches at bird feeders,” according to a notice issued last week by Alpine County Health Officer

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Salmonella outbreak in Washington and 7 other states is linked to bird feeders, CDC says

A salmonella outbreak linked to contact with wild songbirds and bird feeders has sickened 19 people across eight states, eight of whom have been hospitalized, federal health authorities said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it was investigating salmonella infections in California, Kentucky, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Oregon, Tennessee and Washington state in people ranging in age from 2 months to 89 years old.

Six cases were reported in Washington and five in Oregon. No deaths have been reported.

Public health officials across the country interviewed 13 who were infected and asked them about animals they had come

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Salmonella Outbreak Is Linked to Wild Birds and Feeders, C.D.C. Says

A salmonella outbreak linked to contact with wild songbirds and bird feeders has sickened 19 people across eight states, eight of whom have been hospitalized, federal health authorities said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it was investigating salmonella infections in California, Kentucky, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Oregon, Tennessee and Washington State in people ranging in age from 2 months to 89 years old.

Six cases were reported in Washington and five in Oregon. No deaths have been reported.

Public health officials across the country interviewed 13 of the people who were infected and asked them about

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Bird feeders are safe, unless you see this, SC officials say

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A pine siskin is a small, brown-streaked songbird with a short, deeply notched tail and a finely tipped bill.

It’s safe to put out bird feeders again, unless a particular species of songbird — pine siskins — are seen hanging around, South Carolina wildlife officials said.

In March, the Department of Natural Resources pleaded with residents to take down their bird feeders as bird deaths spiked across South Carolina and surrounding states, due to a salmonella outbreak, McClatchy News reported.

Feeders are generally dirty places and ideal environments for salmonella to thrive, and then sicken unlucky birds that

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Woman believes neighbor’s bird feeders are attracting unwanted wildlife to the area

DENVER — A Denver woman says small creatures are causing big problems for her and nearby neighbors.

“We have an issue with the neighbor who feeds the wildlife. It’s been an ongoing issue for two years now. We’ve tried being neighborly.” said Cassie Childers, a resident of the Baker neighborhood.

Childers said since she’s moved in, she’s dealt with an influx of squirrel feces, pieces of corn on the cob and peanut shells.

“This is after I’ve already cleaned up the yard this afternoon,” said Childers, holding pieces of squirrel poop in her hand.

She believes the items are being

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Residents can put bird feeders back up

Good news for Washington’s backyard bird watchers: the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has OK’d the return of bird feeders starting in April as reports of sick and dead birds have started to decline.

In January, the department advised residents in King, Kitsap, Skagit, Snohomish and Thurston counties to take down all feeders as a deadly outbreak of salmonellosis was spreading in the area’s songbirds, fueled by an dramatic increase in population of pine siskins from Canada.

The birds were spreading the easily transmissible bacterial disease through saliva and droppings in congregate settings like bird feeders and baths.

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